01 February 2009

Farca Luna and colleagues, 2009

Journal of Biological Rhythms coverFarca Luna AJ, Hurtado-Zavala JI, Reischig T & Heinrich R. 2009. Circadian regulation of agonistic behavior in groups of parthenogenetic marbled crayfish, Procambarus sp. Journal of Biological Rhythms 24(1): 64-72. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0748730408328933

Abstract

Crustaceans have frequently been used to study the neuroethology of both agonistic behavior and circadian rhythms, but whether their highly stereotyped and quantifiable agonistic activity is controlled by circadian pacemakers has, so far, not been investigated. Isolated marbled crayfish (Procambarus spec.) displayed rhythmic locomotor activity under 12-h light:12-h darkness (LD12:12) and rhythmicity persisted after switching to constant darkness (DD) for 8 days, suggesting the presence of endogenous circadian pacemakers. Isogenetic females of parthenogenetic marbled crayfish displayed all behavioral elements known from agonistic interactions of previously studied decapod species including the formation of hierarchies. Groups of marbled crayfish displayed high frequencies of agonistic encounters during the 1st hour of their cohabitation, but with the formation of hierarchies agonistic activities were subsequently reduced to low levels. Group agonistic activity was entrained to periods of exactly 24 h under LD12:12, and peaks of agonistic activity coincided with light-to-dark and dark-to-light transitions. After switching to DD, enhanced agonistic activity was dispersed over periods of 8-to 10-h duration that were centered around the times corresponding with light-to-dark transitions during the preceding 3 days in LD12:12. During 4 days under DD agonistic activity remained rhythmic with an average circadian period of 24.83 ± 1.22 h in all crayfish groups tested. Only the most dominant crayfish that participated in more than half of all agonistic encounters within the group revealed clear endogenous rhythmicity in their agonistic behavior, whereas subordinate individuals, depending on their social rank, initiated only between 19.4% and 0.03% of all encounters in constant darkness and displayed no statistically significant rhythmicity. The results indicate that both locomotion and agonistic social interactions are rhythmic behaviors of marbled crayfish that are controlled by light-entrained endogenous pacemakers.

Keywords: circadian regulation • agonistic behavior • social hierarchy • locomotion • crustacea • marbled crayfish

2 comments:

coturnix said...

Thank you for posting your comment on my post - just discovered it in the spam folder and rescued it. That explains a LOT. I hope you like their paper and my post.

Zen said...

Just for context, the comment and post being referred to is here.