19 June 2018

Herrmann and colleagues, 2018

Herrmann A, Schnabler A, Martens A. 2018. Phenology of overland dispersal in the invasive crayfish Faxonius immunis (Hagen) at the Upper Rhine River area. Knowledge and Management of Aquatic Ecosystems 419: 30. https://doi.org/10.1051/kmae/2018018

Abstract

The non-indigenous crayfish Faxonius immunis (Hagen) is the dominant crayfish species at the Upper Rhine River system since his detection in 1993. As an invasive alien species, it is one of the biggest threats to aquatic biodiversity in the area. By dispersing over land, the species has a high potential to colonize small ponds created for threatened amphibians and dragonflies. Shortly after invasion, the fast growing population of F. immunis is changing the habitat drastically. In June 2016, our team started a local information campaign including citizen science project where the local people south of Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, could contact us when they spot a crayfish migrating over land to assess the activity of overland dispersal on a regional scale. Until January 2018, we got a total of 98 responses. Thirty-nine include suitable information including 33 records of overland dispersal of F. immunis. The species was recorded on land throughout the year, except February and July. Additionally, single observations of overland dispersal of other invasive crayfish species, naming Procambarus clarkii (Girard), Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana), Procambarus virginalis (Lyko) and Faxonius limosus (Rafinesque), were recorded.

Keywords: amphibian conservation • citizen science • management • biological invasions • non-indigenous species

08 June 2018

If this is 2018, this must be Estonia

Estonia has now become the...

Wait a second, I’ve lost count.

  1. Germany.
  2. Italy.
  3. Netherlands.
  4. Hungary.
  5. Croatia.
  6. Slovakia.
  7. Romania.
  8. Sweden.
  9. Ukraine.
  10. Czech Republic.
  11. ...
Eleventh European country where Marmorkrebs have been found in outdoors. This is according to a press release from the Estonian Research Council. The crayfish were collected last year, not recognized as Marmorkrebs until the end of the year, and a repeat visit at the end of May confirmed a population was there.

I have updated the map of Marmorkrebs introductions accordingly.

External links

The marbled crayfish have established themselves in Narva power plant